porygonluva:

hi, so, uh

I assume a lot of people are hailing joan rivers as a feminist icon mainly because she opened comedy up to women through her standup

but, uh, unsurprisingly she was not the first to do that

image

that’s moms mabley.  she was a comedian in the 20th century and was pretty much one of the few popular female comedians during that time.  she did a lot of things people were uncomfortable doing at that time, like incorporating talks about racism into her standup and such.  she was really popular

(psst she was even doing comedy before joan rivers was born)

she also inspired quite a few comedians you probably know about today like bill cosby and whoopi goldberg (whoopi even did a whole documentary on her because she was so enamored with her)

she was also a lesbian and did standup in androgynous clothing a lot of the time.  and she was african american.  makes you wonder why you’ve probably never heard of her before huh

so before you go give all the credit to joan rivers for getting women into comedy or being a feminist icon or whatever, remember moms mabley and her contributions too

(via navigatethestream)

3 weeks ago 22,663 notes
"

Womanist

  1. From womanish. (Opp. of ‘girlish,’ i.e. frivolous, irresponsible, not serious.) A black feminist or feminist of color. From the black folk expression of mothers to female children, “you acting womanish,” i.e., like a woman. Usually referring to outrageous, audacious, courageous, or willful behavior. Wanting to know more and in greater depth than is considered ‘good’ for one. Interested in grown up doings. Acting grown up. Being grown up. Interchangeable with another black folk expression: ‘You trying to be grown.’ Responsible. In charge. Serious.
  2. Also: A woman who loves other women, sexually and/or nonsexually. Appreciates and prefers women’s culture, women’s emotional flexibility (values tears as natural counterbalance of laughter), and women’s strength. Sometimes loves individual men, sexually and/or nonsexually. Committed to survival and wholeness of entire people, male and female. Not separatist, except periodically, for health. Traditionally a universalist, as in: ‘Mama, why are we brown, pink, and yellow, and our cousins are white, beige, and black?’ Ans: ‘Well, you know the colored race is just like a flower garden, with every color flower represented.’ Traditionally capable, as in: ‘Mama, I’m walking to Canada and I’m taking you and a bunch of other slaves with me.’ Reply: ‘It wouldn’t be the first time.’
  3. Loves music. Loves dance. Loves the Spirit. Loves love and food and roundness. Loves struggle. Loves the Folk. Loves herself. Regardless.
  4. Womanist is to feminist as purple is to lavender.
"
— Alice Walker, “Womanist,” In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens (via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

(Source: boiaesthetic, via ynannarising)

3 weeks ago 1,037 notes

yourmediahasproblems:

you see, it’s absolute nonsense that the media is now referring to joan rivers as a feminist icon

but it’s also incredibly easy to understand

joan rivers did not challenge the status quo or attack the patriarchy. she in fact upheld it, as well as perpetuated racism, homophobia, transmisogyny, etc.

but she was also a woman who did things, so the media took that and twisted it and is now using her as some sort of pseudo feminist icon so they can say “see!!! we’re supporting feminism!!!” while actually supporting basically the opposite of what feminism stands for

so they get their ~feminist credentials~ while still upholding patriarchal values

oh, ffs.

3 weeks ago 1,654 notes

White privilege

elige:

afro-dominicano:

ethiopianbutamerican:

Forty-six million white adults today can trace the origins of their family wealth to the Homestead Act of 1862. This bill gave away valuable acres of land for free to white families, but expressly precluded participation by Blacks.

"how do I have privilege?"

Holy FUCK

JUST IN CASE YOU DIDN’T KNOW.

(via karnythia)

3 weeks ago 20,329 notes

i went back and forth about this for days.

so much so, that i looked up and it was like OH SHIT TODAY’S THE DAY. i negotiated w/ my landlord to pay rent today instead of monday bc i didn’t have it. like, i did some math and … well, even with my 2nd part time job, i don’t make enough to pay these bills. that’s something i’m working on along w/ the overall paralyzing fear/ shame cycle because i simply don’t have it.

what’s going on right now: i am short. $350. and i can’t push this back any farther. at all. so, if you have it to spare, i’m accepting paypal donations. sparklebuckwild@gmail.com. my landlord accepts paypal, and that makes my life easier.

i’m also accepting JOB LEADS IN NYC. i’m a childcare provider, a career admin, and a workshop facilitator. feel free to leave those in my tumblr inbox or email them to me. thank you.

3 weeks ago 20 notes

be-blackstar:

bellecosby:

hoetonsinthenucleyaaas:

bellecosby:

*Fred Phelps dies* 

Tumblr: WOOOP 

*Joan Rivers dies*

Tumblr: well, I mean she had a family…

I have to unfollow you at this point for this. Like, they’re not the same. Joan has said some awful things but some of the shit I see YOU post ain’t so holy. And not to mention, Fred Phelps is another level of active racism and prejudice. If you didn’t care about her so much, shut the fuck up and ignore her death.

image


LOL. I love that this where people have decided to draw their moral lines. 

Joan Rivers says Palestinians deserve to die, is racist, slut-shames, and is transmisogynistic 

*crickets*

*bellecosby points out that Joan Rivers was a terrible person* 

OH! I have to unfollow you now, have some decency! 


y’all play WAY too fucking much. just say it: “it bothers me that my fave was terrible.”

(via bellecosby)

3 weeks ago 343 notes
lacienegasmiled:

Michael Jackson’s medical records from January 1984 show that he had recently been diagnosed with discoid lupus.
Discoid lupus is an autoimmune disease where the body fights against itself, and Jackson’s expressed itself in hair loss, scalp infections, pleurisy in his lungs, skin rashes, skin lesions, joint pain and it would seem his vitiligo was also an expression of his lupus. Vitiligo is a common side autoimmune disease to many sufferers of lupus.
So when people tell you that Michael Jackson bleached himself into his vitiligo, ask them how he managed to get his medical records from 1984 to reflect that he had been suffering from a more severe form of autoimmune disease all along, and if he faked his vitiligo, did he also fake his lupus back then to the extent he had to take medication to ensure his pleurisy wouldn’t return, medication to stem the hair and skin issues, and also that he was already seeing a rhuematologist for joint issues all the way back then, during the height of his fame?
At some point people need to accept that they were very very wrong about him.

lacienegasmiled:

Michael Jackson’s medical records from January 1984 show that he had recently been diagnosed with discoid lupus.

Discoid lupus is an autoimmune disease where the body fights against itself, and Jackson’s expressed itself in hair loss, scalp infections, pleurisy in his lungs, skin rashes, skin lesions, joint pain and it would seem his vitiligo was also an expression of his lupus. Vitiligo is a common side autoimmune disease to many sufferers of lupus.

So when people tell you that Michael Jackson bleached himself into his vitiligo, ask them how he managed to get his medical records from 1984 to reflect that he had been suffering from a more severe form of autoimmune disease all along, and if he faked his vitiligo, did he also fake his lupus back then to the extent he had to take medication to ensure his pleurisy wouldn’t return, medication to stem the hair and skin issues, and also that he was already seeing a rhuematologist for joint issues all the way back then, during the height of his fame?

At some point people need to accept that they were very very wrong about him.

(via howtobeterrell)

1 month ago 2,488 notes

Prison Culture » Erasing Fannie Lou and Other Black Women Victimized By Police…


Another man/boy shot (not again). Unarmed (his black skin is weaponized). Killed by cops (since slavery). The terrible ever-expanding litany of names: Amadou, Sean, Oscar, Rodney, Trayvon, Michael… We’re on a first name basis (excruciatingly familiar). Collective mourning and grief ensue (my tear ducts are dried out; there’s only rage). Calls for justice in the black community (justice is prosecution and prison). #BlackLivesMatter on a social media loop (numbing). We are trying to convince ourselves that it’s true (we don’t fully believe it). Please make it true (it’s a symbolic prayer).

In the background, a faint sound (a whisper). Aiyanna, Tyisha, Renisha, Rekia (background noise). Woman/girls shot (do they shoot black girls & women?). Unarmed (her skin is a bullet magnet). Killed by cops (since slavery). They are not household names (excruciatingly unfamiliar). A few people mourn (silently). Some calls for justice (more prosecutions and prison). #BlackLivesMatter? (But which ones?)

You’re so selfish. This isn’t the right time, the voice intones. Is that voice in my head? I can’t tell. There never seems to be a ‘right’ time to remember the names of murdered black women (never). Sadness and grief threaten to overwhelm (so tired). Stubbornly I remember (an act of defiance).

In 1999, Tyisha Miller was on her way to a party with her cousin when her car got a flat tire. They pulled into a gas station in downtown Riverside, California. Her cousin went to get help and left Tyisha who had been drinking alone in the car. Miller apparently passed out with the doors locked. She had a handgun on her lap.
A few minutes later, four Riverside police officers (all of them white) who had been called to the scene tried to wake Tyisha to no avail.

They smashed the driver’s side window and chaos ensued. At least one of the cops thought that he saw Tyisha reach for her gun. The officers fired 27 shots into the car and Miller was hit 12 times. She died.

Black people are always reaching for guns…

In the mugshot photo, Fannie Lou Hamer has her arms up in the universal surrender pose (or is it universal?).

fannielou

The photo circulates on social media. Re-purposed and remixed for a new generation to memorialize a 21st century police execution. The sampled track of a new freedom song. “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot!” the protesters chant.

Fannie Lou stares back at us from behind the lens (hands up, don’t shoot?). What percentage of people who see the mugshot (without the explanatory text) know of Mrs. Hamer, let alone her abuse by police? (15%).

The monster is insatiable and needs to be constantly fed. More images from black struggle, more trafficking in black death (blackness is property; we don’t belong to ourselves). Hungry for more… to consume and exploit. Black suffering erased again. Fannie Lou’s suffering invisible and (un)felt. Mrs. Hamer warned us: “A black woman’s body was never hers alone.” Our bodies are common property still; no boundaries bound to be respected. The cause is bigger than individual pain (right?).

Tell us what happened to you in Winona, Mrs. Hamer? (can the dead talk?). Danielle McGuire tells the story:

After being arrested with other Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) activists for desegregating a restaurant, Hamer received a savage and sexually abusive beating by the Winona police. “You bitch,” one officer yelled, “we going to make you wish you was dead.” He ordered two black inmates to beat Hamer with “a long wide blackjack,” while other patrolmen battered “her head and other parts of her body.” As they assaulted her, Hamer felt them repeatedly “pull my dress over my head and try to feel under my clothes.” She attempted to pull her dress down during the brutal attack in order to “preserve some respectability through the horror and disgrace.” Hamer told this story on national television at the Democratic National Convention in 1964 and continued to tell it “until the day she died,” offering her testimony of the sexual and racial injustice of segregation.’”(p.910)

Some say that you purposely underplayed the sexual violence associated with the beating that you received in jail, Mrs Hamer (were you ashamed? you did nothing wrong). Black women are also victims of police violence. The beat goes on. Is it the right time to bring this up yet?

1 month ago  #prison #prison industrial complex #us prison system #police brutality #fannie lou hamer #black women #black lives matter  56 notes